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Understanding the GMAT Scoring


GMAT is the first milestone on your road to business school. With a rigorous GMAT exam, you can show your potential university admissions committee that you have what it takes. As such, you must understand what drives your score and how you can maximize your

performance with our GMAT preparation program.


We help you prepare for every reason that could increase your score, including prior experience or test-taking strategies. The GMAT is taken by all MBA aspirants who want to study at one of the world's most prestigious business schools.


GMAT Score Overview

The GMAT is a standardized test taken by thousands of students each year seeking

admission to a graduate business school in the US. GMAT scores range from 200 to 800

and are differentiated based on the various skills tested in each test. A general overview of GMAT scores is explained in detail below:


The GMAT score ranges from 200 to 800, with 800 being the highest possible. The GMAT is scored in ten-point increments. (For instance, 700, 710, 720, and so on.) Approximately 70% of test takers score between 400 and 600.


Your combined Verbal and Quantitative scores determine your GMAT Score. The GMAT

uses its algorithm to transform your Verbal and Quantitative results to the standard 200-800 scale, with a mean score of 552.


Only 9% of these students score 700 or higher, 1% score 760 or higher, and 93 percent fail to achieve what is considered a good GMAT Score.

The top ten business schools, such as Stanford, Harvard, Wharton, and Yale, have an

average GMAT score of 730, which is in the 96th percentile.

GMAT Section

Scaled Score

Verbal Reasoning

6-51

Quantitative Reasoning

6-51

Integrated Reasoning

1-8

Analytical Writing Assessment

0-6

What is a Good GMAT Score?

This question necessitates a more subjective response than just a number. At first glance, a score of 700 or higher may be considered reasonable. However, not all test-takers may

achieve their goals.


It is a well-known fact that to gain admission to the top business schools, candidates must

score comfortably above 700 points. Most candidates who score less than 700 points may retake the GMAT exam to improve their performance; however, a candidate with a GMAT score of 710 should not attempt to improve his performance.


How is the GMAT scored?

The GMAT is an adaptive test, which is the most crucial concept to comprehend. This

indicates that the questions' difficulty level will change as you perform better. For instance, if you keep answering the questions correctly, the test will keep making the questions harder.


It wants to evaluate your skill level for one simple reason. Compared to someone who

cannot answer questions of a higher difficulty level, a person with an increased ability level can. As a result, two factors affect your GMAT score:


  1. Number of correctly answered questions

  2. The typical difficulty of questions that were correctly answered


How to convert your GMAT score into percentile ranking?

The percentile rank is a standard statistical measure that can be used to compare

standardized test scores to analyze weight distribution in a sample. They say that while your GMAT score will not change, your Percentile Ranking will because GMAT Percentiles are recalculated every summer using exam data from the previous three years.


The percentile associated with a GMAT score represents the percentage of people you

outperformed by obtaining that score.

For example, a total GMAT score of 750 is in the 98th percentile. This means that if you get a GMAT score of 750, you will have outperformed 98% of GMAT test-takers.


Look at the table below to learn about the relationship between GMAT Test Scores and

GMAT Percentiles:

Score

Percentile

760-800

99%ile

750

98%ile

740

97%ile

730

96%ile

720

94%ile

710

91%ile

700

88%ile

690

85%ile

680

82%ile

670

80%ile

660

77%ile

650

73%ile

640

66%ile

610

57%ile

580

46%ile

550

36%ile

510

28%ile

470

18%ile

400

9%ile

340

4%ile

200-210

0%ile


Σχόλια


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